Rhythm 108’s Ooh-la-la Tea Biscuit Will Have Your Garden Saying More, Please

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By: Bill McCool

Looking for a new biscuit to go with that steaming, hot cup of tea this fall?

Look no further than Rhythm 108’s Ooh-la-la Tea Biscuits. Made from whole grain oats and coconut oil they come in four different flavors - lemon and ginger, chocolate hazelnut, almond biscotti, and coconut cookie.

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Launched in 2012 by Siddhi Mehta, Rhythm 108 specializes in wholesome treats that are made using just 8 common household ingredients. Not only are they GMO-free, they’re also gluten free and vegan.

But Mehta’s biscuits aren’t just good for you, they’re good for the environment as well. Teaming up with Parkside Flexibles, each bag of the Ooh-la-la Tea Biscuits is made from biodegradable materials and can be composted in your personal garden when you’re through.

The packaging consists of compostable multilayer film barrier laminates, a technology that was four years in the making for Parkside Flexibles. One of the layers of laminate used in the packaging is NatureFlex, a bio-based cellulose that has been sustainably sourced from eucalyptus trees. Natureflex also happens to be marine degradable, so if your wrapper somehow ends up lost at sea (and we really hope that wasn’t your fault), it can still eventually break down. The packaging itself has even received a gold stamp of approval from Vincotte OK Compost.

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More and more consumers are seeking out biodegradable packaging, and healthy snack-makers, in particular, seem to want to align themselves with sustainably-minded shoppers in particular. It’s an ethical marriage that speaks to a brand like Rhythm 108’s eco-friendly core.

Be on the lookout for Rhythm 108’s tasty treats and don’t forget to throw the bag in the compost bin when you’re all done.


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Bill McCool
Bill McCool is a freelance writer based out of Los Angeles. Though new to the world of design, he has always been a storyteller by trade and he seeks to inspire and cultivate a sense of awe with the work and artists he profiles. When he's not winning over his daughters with the art of the Dad joke, he is usually working on a pilot, watching the Phillies, or cooking an elaborate meal for his wife.