Ola Dubh 1991

Creative branding design agency, threebrand was briefed to create full bottle design and adornment for Ola Dubh 1991, an artisan craft beer with a twist. The task was to create packaging for the beer that reflected the core Ola Dubh brand but signals that although an extension of the core range, it is a different edition.

An extension of the core Ola Dubh range, the product is the first of a new range of craft beers by Harviestoun Brewery where the ale is matured in Highland Park Single Malt whisky casks. 

 

 

The ethos of the Highland Park Whisky look and feel were also to be taken into consideration and balanced within the design.

Nick Cadbury, creative director at threebrand, commented:

“We’ve worked with Harviestoun Brewery for a while now and were delighted to work on brand development for Ola Dubh 1991. It was important to reflect the artisan philosophy of the Ola Dubh brand within the 1991 bottle design. To achieve this we chose a simple craft like design with a clean and almost naïve typography.”

He added: “An equally simple two colour label printed on craft style stock was chosen to reflect the handcrafted nature of the brew and finishing touches such as individually numbered packs and hand labeling were employed to further emphasise this feel.

The ale was released on May 1st in limited numbers and confirmed its premium nature by selling out in 48 hours, six weeks before it was packaged. It has captured a discerning consumer, who loves beautifully brewed craft beer, but also appreciates the subtleties offered by the whisky cask maturing process.

Designed by threebrand, UK

 

To distinguish the 1991 design from the core Ola Dubh range a bottleneck card adornment was added. Threebrand created a humorous link with world events from 1991, cheekily tying them back to Ola Dubh. For example,

 

”1991 – Over 600 crop circles appeared across Britain. One even materialised in front of the Prime Minister’s country residence, despite constant patrol by the nation’s most vigilant troops. Hoax? Or evidence of aliens? We at Harviestoun see it more as a waste of damn good barley.”